Monthly Archives: April 2009

Web as canvas: The evolution of the world wide web as a creative forum

This is an essay that I wrote last year for University. Though I don’t think it’s bad – it could certainly be improved. It should still be of some use / relevance. I really found writing it made me get my head round the concepts I was writing about, and although I understood them all already, it really brought them into focus. Anyway, it’s here; Web as Canvas.

Twitter Updates for 2009-04-12

  • @casualeveryday ever fix your computer playing music randomly? Mine is doing it! Was it some weird female vocal thing? #
  • @casualeveryday thanks for heads up. I really thought I’d gone mad when it started, had no idea where it was coming from. cheers again. in reply to casualeveryday #
  • @Kate_Butler http://tinyurl.com/cafbot – don’t worry, my laptop is playing music on its own! #
  • think i have hay fever, twitter seems to confirm others do too… so maybe i do. Suppose that is preferred to a full on cold #

Twitter Updates for 2009-04-12

  • @casualeveryday ever fix your computer playing music randomly? Mine is doing it! Was it some weird female vocal thing? #
  • @casualeveryday thanks for heads up. I really thought I’d gone mad when it started, had no idea where it was coming from. cheers again. in reply to casualeveryday #
  • @Kate_Butler http://tinyurl.com/cafbot – don’t worry, my laptop is playing music on its own! #
  • think i have hay fever, twitter seems to confirm others do too… so maybe i do. Suppose that is preferred to a full on cold #

Artful Data

I’ve considered making a kind of data to sound generator. Rather like Cornelia Solfrank’s Net Art generator, but like a sound art generator. This is a different approach, that I was led to by browsing Max Tundra’s brilliantly crazy website.

Daniel Cummerow has made various MIDI files (musical arrangements) that are generated by tapping into various areas of mathmatics. He’s producing the sound of maths. A fantastic idea. It also explains – to some extent – the multi-timbral soundscapes that Max Tundra produces.

Listen to an example of Daniel’s work, using Pascal’s Triangle. This is a MIDI file, most media players should be able to play it OK. Read about MIDI here.

I figured this was a cool example of how data meets art meets data.